REYKJAVIK TO TROMSO

REYKJAVIK TO TROMSO

USD $16110 starting price

Be on the lookout for Iceland’s fabled wildlife – including 13 different species of duck – as you sail into the Arctic on this voyage.

Ship: Silver Wind
Duration: 15 days

DEPARTURE
05 Jul 2021 Request Quote
VOYAGE HIGHLIGHTS

Watch out for whales as you wend your way past majestic red Devonian sandstone mountains into the fjordic paradise of Svalbard. Enjoy Zodiac cruises looking for the icon of the North, aka the emblematic polar bear and, weather permitting, enjoy shore walks and kayak outings along the rugged coastline.

Day 1 Reykjavik

Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation’s nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island’s population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík’s name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there’s no smoke around.

Day 2 Grundarfjorudur

As double acts go, Kirkjufellsfoss Waterfall and Kirkjufell Mountain are hard to beat. Said to be Iceland’s most photographed spot, the perfectly symmetrical mountain taper of Kirkjufell complements the roaring waterfall, and is said to be the most photographed spot in Iceland. That’s a bold claim, considering the country’s abundance of natural assets, but this natural duo is an undeniably unique and mesmerising sight. Occasionally, as the sun fades away, a stunning trio is formed, with the northern lights dancing overhead, casting its ethereal green haze over the scene below. Reach the stirring views with a short walk from Grundarfjorudur town, or head out into the wilderness on horseback, along well-trampled bridleways. The mountain is known as Church Mountain, due to its isolated peak, which pierces the sky like a spire

Day 3 Sudureyri

Sudureyri is a typical small fishing village in Iceland’s Westfjords at the entrance of Sugandafjord. Unlike most other fishing villages that date back hundreds of years Sudureyri was only started in the early 20th century and has some 270 inhabitants. As the Sugandafjord is surrounded by high mountains the only way to safely reach Sudureyri used to be by boat. Since the village has been connected to the outside world by tunnel (opened only in 1996) it has been visited by those interested in angling and fishing for cod and halibut in the fjord and open water. Just east of the village is the Lagoon an area that has been dammed off. Cod has been released into the lagoon and visitors are encouraged to feed the fish -this actually is considered the village’s main attraction. The cod can easily return to open waters via a pipe place under the dyke’s road but many seem to like being fed.

Day 4 Siglufjordur

A tiny town in the scenic north of Iceland, cosseted away by a jagged wall of mountain peaks, Siglufjordur is an isolated gem. With just over a thousand residents, Siglufjordur takes its name from the glassy fjord that stretches out nearby. Iceland’s northernmost town, only a single-lane road tunnel, bored through the snow-capped mountains, provides a land link with the rest of the country. This evocative remoteness appealed to dark Nordic Noir writers – and the town has found recent fame as the star of the TV show Trapped. A much warmer welcome awaits you in real life than in fiction – fortunately. Siglufjordur is a historic Atlantic capital of herring fishing, and you can learn of the industry that gave the town its raison d’etre, and powered Iceland’s economy at the award-winning Herring Era Museum.

Day 5 Husavik

There’s simply nowhere better than Husavilk – the European capital of whale watching – for getting up close and personal with the majestic giants of the ocean. Feel the awe as whales breach the waves around you, before gulping in air and plunging away with almighty tale flicks. Pretty Husavik is framed by the majestic Húsavíkurfjall mountain, which swells up behind, creating a stunning backdrop for the town’s tiny wooden warehouses, cherry red houses and undulating fishing ships. The little wooden church has been a beacon of light, guiding tired fishermen back to the shores of Iceland’s oldest settlement, since 1907. Let the wind rip through your hair and the sea speckle your face, as you ride waves out among the region’s almighty marine creatures, who throw their weight around so spectacularly. Sail among gentle giants in Shaky Bay, spotting humpbacks, minke whales and the world’s biggest – blue whales.

Day 6 At Sea

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 7 Jan Mayen Island

Jan Mayen is an isolated Norwegian island halfway between Svalbard and Iceland. The most prominent feature on the island is the snow-covered volcano Beerenberg and its ice cap. Although the island and surrounding sea have been used for whaling and sealing, the only people living on the island now are members of the Norwegian Armed Forces and of the Meteorological Station on Jan Mayen’s southeastern side. During a nature walk leading up to the station and the long black sandy beach on the eastern shore several plant and bird species can be seen. The island is an important bird area because of Northern Fulmars, Brünnich’s and Black Guillemots and Little Auks nesting there.

Day 8 At Sea

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 9 Svalbard Northern Region

Svalbard’s northern region is less influenced by the Norwegian Current coming through the Greenland Sea than the southern region and shows more ice. The northern part of the island of Spitsbergen shows quite a number of impressive fjords, bays and glaciers. The Nordaust Svalbard Nature Reserve includes Spitsbergen’s east coast, the Hinlopen Strait, Nordaustlandet and some islands further east like Kvitoya and Storoya. Several walrus haul-outs, spectacular glaciers, bird cliffs and bird islands, as well as surprising flora in Arctic deserts and the possibility to see polar bears and to visit historically important sites make this an area prone for exploration. Ice conditions will dictate which sites can be seen.

Day 10 Svalbard Northern Region

Svalbard’s northern region is less influenced by the Norwegian Current coming through the Greenland Sea than the southern region and shows more ice. The northern part of the island of Spitsbergen shows quite a number of impressive fjords, bays and glaciers. The Nordaust Svalbard Nature Reserve includes Spitsbergen’s east coast, the Hinlopen Strait, Nordaustlandet and some islands further east like Kvitoya and Storoya. Several walrus haul-outs, spectacular glaciers, bird cliffs and bird islands, as well as surprising flora in Arctic deserts and the possibility to see polar bears and to visit historically important sites make this an area prone for exploration. Ice conditions will dictate which sites can be seen.

Day 11 Svalbard Southern Region

Svalbard’s Southern Region and specifically Spitsbergen’s west coast is less ice-clogged than the rest of Svalbard due to the moderating influenced of the Gulf Stream. Several fjords cut into the western coast of Spitsbergen and have been used by trappers and hunters, as well as the different mining companies that tried to exploit the riches of the archipelago’s largest island of Spitsbergen. Remains of huts and mines, as well as active commercial and scientific settlements can be found and visited. Depending on the time of the season, glaciers can be visited on foot or by sea. Hornsund will reveal fascinating views of geological formations, craggy mountains, spectacular glaciers and a variety of seabirds and seals.

Day 12 Svalbard Southern Region

Svalbard’s Southern Region and specifically Spitsbergen’s west coast is less ice-clogged than the rest of Svalbard due to the moderating influenced of the Gulf Stream. Several fjords cut into the western coast of Spitsbergen and have been used by trappers and hunters, as well as the different mining companies that tried to exploit the riches of the archipelago’s largest island of Spitsbergen. Remains of huts and mines, as well as active commercial and scientific settlements can be found and visited. Depending on the time of the season, glaciers can be visited on foot or by sea. Hornsund will reveal fascinating views of geological formations, craggy mountains, spectacular glaciers and a variety of seabirds and seals.

Day 13 Svalbard Southern Region

Svalbard’s Southern Region and specifically Spitsbergen’s west coast is less ice-clogged than the rest of Svalbard due to the moderating influenced of the Gulf Stream. Several fjords cut into the western coast of Spitsbergen and have been used by trappers and hunters, as well as the different mining companies that tried to exploit the riches of the archipelago’s largest island of Spitsbergen. Remains of huts and mines, as well as active commercial and scientific settlements can be found and visited. Depending on the time of the season, glaciers can be visited on foot or by sea. Hornsund will reveal fascinating views of geological formations, craggy mountains, spectacular glaciers and a variety of seabirds and seals.

Day 14 Cruise & Explore Bear Island

Bear Island is considered Svalbard’s southernmost island, roughly half way between Spitsbergen and Norway’s North Cape. Although the last polar bears were seen in 2004, the name goes back to Dutch explorer Willem Barentsz and his visit in 1596. The island has been used to hunt walrus, for whaling, and even coal mining has taken place. The strategic location on the border of the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea has led to a meteorological station being set up by Norway near Gravodden on Bear Island’s north coast. Some two thirds of the island is a relatively flat plain with shallow freshwater lakes and Ramsar Wetland, while the entire island and the surrounding waters are a Nature Reserve. Bear Island has also been designated an Import Bird Area as it is a staging area for Pink-footed and Barnacle Geese and the steep cliffs south of Sørhamna are home to thousands of breeding seabirds.

Day 15 Skarsvag (Nordkapp)

For those who like to travel far (very far) off the beaten track, then you have found your Nordic nirvana in Skarsvag. Large, sparsely populated (there are just 60 human year round residents), and a joy to all those who revel in stark, unbridled beauty, Skarsvag also enjoys the auspicious title of being the world’s most northerly fishing village. But rolling hills, prolific birdlife and arctic fjords aside, Skarsvag is above all famous for its proximity to the North Cape. Found on the island of Magerøya, the most northernmost point of Europe above the arctic circle is a bucket list basic. Stand beneath the massive metal globe and gaze out onto the Barents Sea, where the only land between you and the North Pole is the Svalbard archipelago. This is truly the land of the midnight sun – in fact, you are so far north that the sun doesn’t even dip beneath the horizon between May and mid-July.

SILVER WIND

Break new waters with Silver Wind.

A major upgrade in December 2018 will see Silver Wind looking better than ever. A second refurbishment in summer 2021 will see her benefitting from a strengthened to ice-class hull and will make her one of the most adaptable ships in our fleet. Still timelessly elegant, still luxuriously relaxed, her improved cruising versatility means she is able to whizz from the Polar Regions at the ends of the earth to the iconic ports of the Mediterranean with fluid ease. So whether you want to get up close and personal to penguins in Antarctica or laze on the golden sands of the Caribbean, get ready for a wealth of diverse destination experiences, in traditional Silversea comfort.

Ship Specifications

Guests capacity: 274
Crew capacity: 239
Built: 1995
Last refurbishment: 2020
Tonnage: 17,400 Tons

SILVER WIND IN PICTURES

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Reykjavik to Tromso
Duratin: 15 Days

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Reykjavik to Tromso
Duratin: 15 Days