YOKOHAMA (TOKYO) to YOKOHAMA (TOKYO)

YOKOHAMA (TOKYO) to YOKOHAMA (TOKYO)

USD $8010 starting price

With luck on your side, this may be your opportunity to visit Japan’s fabled Sakura. Famously erratic, the cherry blossom season is perhaps the eighth wonder of the world.

Ship: Silver Muse
Duration: 14 days

DEPARTURE
5 April 2021 Request Quote
19 April 2021 Request Quote
25 March 2022 Request Quote
8 April 2022 Request Quote
22 April 2022 Request Quote
VOYAGE HIGHLIGHTS

Visit the parks of Osaka, Aomori, Hakodate and Sakata, searching for the delicate blossom. In other ports enjoy the shrines and temples that are a place of zen spirituality, no matter what you believe. Hiroshima and Nagasaki’s Peace Parks will not leave you unmoved.

Day 1 Yokohama (Tokyo)

Flying as far under the radar as Japan’s second-biggest city possibly can, only a 30-minute train ride separates Yokohama from Tokyo’s metropolis. Sat a little further to the south of the Bay of Tokyo than the Japanese capital, Yokohama is a place to enjoy waterfront strolls and the warmest of welcomes, as you arrive and acclimatise to this city in the bustling heart of Japan. Step into this ocean of urbanity, where major cities merge and blend together, and it’s hard to square Yokohama’s fishing village origins with the vast urban sprawl that you encounter today. An outward-looking place, Yokohama was one of the first to open its harbour to international trade, leading to a rapid transformation from village to big city. The opening of the ports drew many Chinese traders to the bay, and Yokohama houses the country’s biggest Chinatown – a colourful and historic explosion of Chinese shops and more than 250 eateries.

Landmark Tower is hard to miss, puncturing the sky as Japan’s second-largest building, it looks out over the water and rises before the distant loom of Mount Fuji. The towering ferris wheel nearby is one of the world’s tallest, and flashes with colour amid the glowing skyline at night. Enjoy breezy strolls along the lively waterfront, with heritage ships, museums and tempting restaurants bordering the sparking bay’s waters. Offering the excitement that only landing on Japanese shores can offer, Yokohama is a great starting point for any adventure to this land of culture, colour and grace. Whether you want to venture onwards to Tokyo’s neon-bathed wonders, see Mount Fuji up close, or find peace and tranquillity in Kyoto’s majestic temples and shrines, Yokohama opens up the best of Japan’s wonders to you.

Day 2 Shimizu

Feel your heart thumping, at your first sight of Japan’s most heavenly vision – Mount Fuji’s cone emerging through the haze. With its summit dipped in pure white snow, the iconic volcano’s cone is one of the most famous natural landmarks in the world – and a picturesque backdrop for Shimizu. Come ashore to this serene vision of beauty – and whether you head straight for the siren-call of the volcano’s slopes, or the sanctuary of gorgeous, heritage-rich shrines, and tranquil tea plantations – spine-tingling views of Japan’s most tallest mountain are never far away. A perfectly symmetrical spectacle, visible for miles around, Mount Fuji is an adored national symbol of Japan. Travel closer to its slopes to soak in some of the country’s finest panoramas. Or take in the views with a dash of local culture, at the Fujisan Hongu Sengen Shrine – an elegant shrine, that stands in thrall to the salt and pepper volcano close by.

Day 3 Osaka

Japan’s third-biggest city has thrown off its shackles and stepped out of the shadows to light up the sky with glaring neon signs and a larger than life outlook. Giant octopuses cling to buildings and bustling restaurants pack in the crowds in this great and garish place, which is Japan at its most friendly, extroverted and flavourful. So dive in headfirst to experience an all-out sensory assault of delicious food, shopping cathedrals and glittering temples. Dotombori Bridge bathes in the multicoloured, jewel-like lights of signage-plastered buildings, and the neon lights dance on the canal’s waters below. Osaka is known as the nation’s kitchen, and the Kuromon Ichiba Market has served as the city’s spot to tuck in for almost 200 years. Full of street food stalls – try pufferfish, savoury Okonomiyaki pancakes, or ginger and onion flavoured octopus, among the endless feast of exotic flavours.

Day 4 Osaka

Japan’s third-biggest city has thrown off its shackles and stepped out of the shadows to light up the sky with glaring neon signs and a larger than life outlook. Giant octopuses cling to buildings and bustling restaurants pack in the crowds in this great and garish place, which is Japan at its most friendly, extroverted and flavourful. So dive in headfirst to experience an all-out sensory assault of delicious food, shopping cathedrals and glittering temples. Dotombori Bridge bathes in the multicoloured, jewel-like lights of signage-plastered buildings, and the neon lights dance on the canal’s waters below. Osaka is known as the nation’s kitchen, and the Kuromon Ichiba Market has served as the city’s spot to tuck in for almost 200 years. Full of street food stalls – try pufferfish, savoury Okonomiyaki pancakes, or ginger and onion flavoured octopus, among the endless feast of exotic flavours.

Day 5 Day at sea

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 6 Hiroshima

History buffs will want to write home Hiroshima. Despite being devastated in 1945, this Japanese city is known to all for its commitment peace – its ruin on the 6th August 1945 led to the end of the war and today, the Peace Memorial (a UNESCO World Heritage Site) , is a constant reminder of the destruction that war brings. A walk in the leafy boulevards of Peace Memorial Park brings quiet contemplation. The Flames of Peace – set in the park’s central feature pond – burn brightly and will continue to do so until all the nuclear bombs I the world have been destroyed. There are many other inspiring messages of hope around the city too; the Children’s’ Peace Monument just north of the park is a homage to little Sadako Sasaki, who was just two in 1945. When she developed leukemia in 1956, she believed that if she folded 1,000 paper cranes – a symbol of longevity and happiness in Japan – she would recover.

Day 7 Busan

“A tapestry of kaleidoscopic colours, intense seafood flavours, and urban beach bliss, Busan rolls across a glorious natural setting on the Korean Peninsula’s south-east. One of the largest and busiest ports in the world, 3.5 million people call South Korea’s second city home, and the amiable locals help to lend the city its quirky, offbeat outlook. A spacious, playful and cosmopolitan place, Busan is a lively, liveable city, cradled by lush mountains and endless ocean scenery.  Haedong Yonggung Temple nestles on a dramatic cliffside, just above the crumbling rocks and crashing waves of the East Sea. Dating back to 1376, the temple’s multi-storey pagoda is adorned with lions – each representing a different emotion. Elsewhere, lanterns glitter in the night sky around Mount Geumjeongsan, freshly released from the beautiful Beomeosa Temple, which was established in AD 678.

Day 8 At sea

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 9 Kanazawa

The capital of the Ishikawa Prefecture, Kanazawa once rivalled Kyoto and Edo (Tokyo) as a town rich in cultural achievements. Kanazawa escaped destruction during World War II and accordingly has been able to preserve many of the old districts in good shape. The city is famous because of Kenrokuen. Located next to Kanazawa Castle, Kenrokuen is classified as “One of the Three Gardens of Japan”. The garden has an artificial pond, and hills and houses are dotted within the 11.4 hectares. It has Japan’s oldest fountain using natural water pressure and a tea-house dating back to 1774. Close by is the Higashi Chaya Gai Geisha District, designated a National Cultural Asset and the biggest of the Geisha districts of Kanazawa. Some of the houses not only retain the original structure, but still are used as Geisha houses. Some of the streets have traditional shops creating a nostalgic atmosphere.

Day 10 Niigata

A sophisticated sake capital, Niigata is an intoxicating, creative place of Japanese traditions and flavours. Learn of the many crafts and creativities that are practised here, from kite-making to alcohol fermentation and ceramic work, and immerse yourself in the beautiful coastline and waterfall-laced mountains of Niigata prefecture. The city evolves with each season, taking on a new appearance – whether it’s the thick layers of snow during winter, or the cherry blossoms of spring. Look out for the gorgeous curved black roof tiers of Shibata Castle, rising from a picturesque bed of pale-pink flowers. Sitting overlooking the Sea of Japan, out towards the intrigues of Sado Island, where the rare Toki bird – with its scythe-like beak – lives protected. This busy port city is famous for the high-quality and pure taste of its rice

Day 11 Sakata

Say the word Sakata and you would be forgiven for thinking immediately of the lovable dog of the same name. But in fact, visitors to Sakata will be treated not to a friendly furry face, rather to a beautiful city located on the northern tip of the island, around 500 km north of Tokyo. Lucky visitors will arrive in time for the superb sakura (cherry blossom), and surely there can be no sight more lovely than the elegant dip of the cherry trees alongside ancient Samurai residences. Akita is also home to a 2km tunnel of blossoming trees that run along the banks of the Hinokinai River, which is said to “bring a grown man to his knees and weep at its beauty”. If to you, Japan is synonymous with peace and serenity, then a trip to one of the onsens is a superb bucket list experience. Buses and taxis are easily available in the centre of town that will take you to Mizusawa, Oyu and Oyasukyo hot springs, some of the loveliest onsens in the country.

Day 12 Aomori

From fiery festivals to spectacular mountain scenery, soaring temples to castles surrounded by cherry blossom blooms, Aomori is one of Japan’s most enchanting destinations. Framed by dark peaks clad with dense forestry, the city enjoys a picturesque location on Japan’s main island Honshu. While there are gorgeous pink tinted parks, tiered castles and towering Buddha statues to explore, the Aomori Prefecture’s capital is perhaps best known for the summer festival of fire that lights it up each year. Lavish illuminated floats fill the streets during Nebuta Matsuri festival, as dancing locals wave flickering lanterns through the night sky – and drummers pound out pulsating rhythms. Nebuta Matsuri has a euphoric and energetic atmosphere which makes it stand out as an unmissable experience compared with some of Japan’s more restrained festivals.

Day 13 Hakodate (Hokkaido)

Gaze down over Hakodate, from the heights of its namesake peak – Mount Hakodate – to see the city stretching out spectacularly, with back-to-back twin bays splitting the ocean. Hakodate port was one of the first to open Japan up to the world, and to international trade in 1859 – a fact reflected in the architecture, with its influences from the West and beyond. The port area is a redbrick wash of warehouses turned shopping malls, all observed by the onion domes of the city’s Russian Orthodox church. Elsewhere, the star-shaped Goryokaku fortress glows with natural colours and a beautiful haze of cherry blossom during the season. Goryokaku Tower, which rises up beside it, offers a sweeping bird’s eye view of the green fortress and mountain backdrop.

Day 14 At sea

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Yokohama (Tokyo)

Flying as far under the radar as Japan’s second-biggest city possibly can, only a 30-minute train ride separates Yokohama from Tokyo’s metropolis. Sat a little further to the south of the Bay of Tokyo than the Japanese capital, Yokohama is a place to enjoy waterfront strolls and the warmest of welcomes, as you arrive and acclimatise to this city in the bustling heart of Japan. Step into this ocean of urbanity, where major cities merge and blend together, and it’s hard to square Yokohama’s fishing village origins with the vast urban sprawl that you encounter today. An outward-looking place, Yokohama was one of the first to open its harbour to international trade, leading to a rapid transformation from village to big city. The opening of the ports drew many Chinese traders to the bay, and Yokohama houses the country’s biggest Chinatown – a colourful and historic explosion of Chinese shops and more than 250 eateries.

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Yokohama (Tokyo) to Yokohama (Tokyo)
Duration: 14 Days

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Yokohama (Tokyo) to Yokohama (Tokyo)
Duration: 14 Days

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Yokohama (Tokyo) to Yokohama (Tokyo)
Duration: 14 Days

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Yokohama (Tokyo) to Yokohama (Tokyo)
Duration: 14 Days

Request a Quote


Yokohama (Tokyo) to Yokohama (Tokyo)
Duration: 14 Days

Request a Quote


Yokohama (Tokyo) to Yokohama (Tokyo)
Duration: 14 Days